“Troubling Oddities” In A Social Psychology Data Set

A potential case of data manipulation has been uncovered in a psychology paper. The suspect article, Why money meanings matter in decisions to donate time and money, came out in 2012 from University of Arizona psychologists Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose, and Jayati Sinha. This study fell into the genre of 'social priming', specifically 'money priming'. The authors reported that making people think about cash reduces their willingness to help others, while thinking of credit cards has

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Where infants sleep may affect how long they are breastfed

A new study indicates that mothers who frequently sleep, or bed-share, with their infants consistently breastfeed for longer than mothers who do not bed-share. Also, pregnant women who expressed a strong motivation to breastfeed were more likely to bed...

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Cambridge researcher develops smartphone app to map Swiss-German dialects

Researchers from the Universities of Cambridge, Zurich and Bern have taken advantage of 'crowdsourcing' to gather new information on the spread of dialects in German-speaking Switzerland, which has been recently published as a paper in PLOS One.

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‘Absurdly’ high Arctic warmth drives sea ice to record low

Arctic sea ice extent in January was 402,000 square miles below average — an area equivalent to about 60 percent of Alaska In my previous article here at ImaGeo, I featured a Norwegian icebreaker with no winter sea ice to break in the high Arctic. Since then, the National Snow and Ice Data Center has published its monthly update on sea ice conditions — and the news is pretty dramatic. Record warm Arctic air temperatures running an astonishing 11 degrees F above average at the surface hel

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What Lessons Will We Learn From Zika?

Zika virus caught the world off guard, but it shouldn’t have. The rapid spread of the mosquito-borne virus, and its possible connection to birth defects and neurological disorders, compelled the World Health Organization on Monday to declare an international public health emergency. But by that time 1.5 million Brazilians had already caught the virus, and it had spread to 24 countries in the Western Hemisphere. The current tally from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate

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Record Missouri flooding was humanmade calamity, scientist says

Why was the New Year's flood in Missouri so bad? Most news reports blamed it on the heavy rain, but a professor of earth and planetary sciences says analysis of the flood data shows much of the damage was due to recent modifications to the river.

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Would You Stick Pins In A Voodoo Doll of Your Child?

Well? Would you...? This was the question faced by the participants in a rather extraordinary series of studies described in a new paper from Illinois psychologists Randy J. McCarthy and colleagues. In total, 1081 parents with children aged under 18 w...

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Scientists Perfect the Skipping Stone

A friendly trip to the beach often sparks a casual competition to see who is more skilled in the art of skipping a stone. But before the first attempt, a tactful stone-skipper will examine the inventory of seaside rocks to find a one uniquely shaped for the task. Scientists at the aptly named Splash Lab at Utah State University have perfected the skipping stone. Through a series of experiments that applied scientific rigor to our favorite lazy beach activity, they determined that a squish

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